Listen To The Jazz Is PHSH Supergroup Play Instrumental Takes On Phish Classics [Full Audio/Videos]

first_imgFortunately, taper Eric McRoberts captured full audio for us to enjoy! Stream the show in full, below. Last Thursday, February 16th, an all-star crew of musicians assembled for a Jazz Is PHSH performance at the famed Brooklyn Bowl in Brooklyn, NY. This lineup packed a particular punch, with Chris DeAngelis (Kung Fu) on bass, Josh Thomas (With Lions) on keys, Carl Gerhard (Giant Country Horns) on trumpet, James Casey (Trey Anastasio Band) on tenor saxophone, Scott Flynn (Odesza/Pretty Lights) on trombone, Jay Rodriguez (Miles Davis/Groove Collective) on baritone saxophone and flute, and Nate Werth (Snarky Puppy) on percussion. Led by the Chase Brothers, Adam and Matt Chase, this was a night of jammy instrumental cuts from the Phish repertoire. With a new album due out in a few weeks, Jazz Is PHSH showed fans just what this great project is all about!Watch videos of each set opener, “Golgi Apparatus” and “Tweezer,” below, courtesy of nugs.tv.last_img read more

Legislators share URLA concerns, CUNA meets w/ FHFA

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr CUNA met with the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) Wednesday to urge the agency to reconsider adding language preference to its Uniform Residential Loan Application (URLA). CUNA previously expressed concerns about the change in a joint letter last month, and this week 55 members of Congress sent a letter to FHFA Director Mel Watt with similar concerns.The FHFA’s change would add a question to the URLA asking borrowers to indicate their language preference. While the agency has indicated that the question was for data collection and to help servicers in their relationship with borrowers, the language raises numerous concerns for lenders.CUNA’s June letter raises these compliance and legal concerns, and believes that the changes warrant at least a vetting process before the change is made final.The congressional letter also raises the different ways adding a language preference can mislead consumers and raise complex compliance questions. continue reading »last_img read more