Analysis: Baines vote lowers the bar for the Hall

first_imgBy Dave Sheinin | Washington PostLAS VEGAS – Harold Baines was a fine baseball player who played for a very long time – a right fielder-turned-designated hitter who earned six all-star appearances, led the American League in slugging in 1984 and amassed 384 home runs and 2,866 hits over 22 seasons.If you’re into advanced analytics, his wins above replacement (Baseball-Reference version) of 38.7 ranks tied for 545th all-time and puts him in the same neighborhood as contemporaries such as Paul …last_img

The Creative Motivation Behind Deep vs. Shallow Depth of Field

first_imgThis breakdown covers a range of creative motivations behind these two aperture settings, as well as the pros and cons of using each category.Determining the right aperture for a shot is just as important as choosing the right lens. Altering your aperture changes not only the depth of field (a.k.a. the blurry background), but it also controls the emotional tone of a shot. A higher F-stop is more fitting for wide vistas, while a lower one can create a feeling of isolation.In the following breakdown, I’ve narrowed the examples into two separate categories — shallow depth of field (F0.95 – F3.5) and deep depth of field (F4 – F16). Shallow Shots (F0.95 – F3.5)Let’s begin with a shallow depth of field (also known as a narrow depth of field). This low aperture control creates the feeling of isolation between the subject you’re capturing and the world around them because the background is blurrier. The lower the number, the more your primary subject stands out from their surroundings. Using a shallow depth of field enhances the visual style, and it creates a beautiful backdrop.Cons?Despite its dreamy quality, dialing your aperture any higher than an F2.8 creates the ongoing problem of keeping things in focus. Nailing that crisp shot can become tricky since the range of attention is so narrow.Getting Dynamic with Deep Shots (F4 – F16)I’ll openly admit that I’m a sucker for shallow depth of field shots. They’re creamy, dreamy, and, well . . . just super cinematic. That being said, there are some significant perks to filming with a higher aperture setting. First off, everything is in focus. You won’t struggle to get that razor-sharp image at an F16, because there’s no depth. This is helpful if you’re using manual focus, or shooting in nature and trying to capture a massive landscape with all its beautiful details.Cons?The most obvious con for deep depth is that there’s no depth. There’s nothing to separate your subject from the background. This can make character-driven shots look ugly, due to the distraction of the background. Another pitfall comes from your dirty sensor. That’s right! Capturing anything with an F-stop higher than an F4 brings out all the nasty specs on your sensor. Since there’s no depth of field, any piece of dust resting on your sensor or lens becomes much more present in the final frame.Interested in the tracks we used to create this video?“Blue Blood” by Aulx Studio“Success Story” by Vincent ToneLooking for more on cinematography? Check these out.Choosing Aspect Ratio: A Guide to Everything You Need to KnowWhy Filmmakers and Photographers Prefer to Use Soft LightCapturing the Cinematic Moment: Creative Uses for a Color MeterWhere to Find Vintage Lenses (and Tips on How to Use Them)4 Older Cinema Cameras That Hold Up to Today’s Standardslast_img read more

What You Need To Do

first_imgWhen you don’t want to get out of bed, when you want to hit the snooze button, when you really want to retreat to the warm comfort of a few more minutes sleep, that’s the time you most need to muster the will to get up and get moving.When you don’t want to step onto the treadmill, into the gym, or climb under the heavy bar, that’s the time you need to summon your strength and do the work.When the blank page tries to intimidate you into giving up, giving in, and moving on, that’s the time when you need to let loose the words and ideas buried deep inside you struggling to escape.When you don’t want to close the browser, shut the lid, and disconnect, that’s when you most need to stop procrastinating, do the work you are avoiding, and remember why you’re here.When you don’t want to make the call because there is too much at risk, there’s too much at stake, and there’s too much to lose, that’s when you need to unleash your hidden power and dial the seven digits.When you don’t want to do the work, grind it out, or exert the necessary effort to get results, that’s when you need to take action and begin.When your scared to death to start that new thing, to go it alone, to step out onto the ledge and risk the chance, that’s the time to look fear in the eye, to stare it down, and to do what you were made for.When others insist that you can’t, that you will fail, that you will be hurt and embarrassed, that’s when you need to recognize that their fears aren’t your fears, that failure is just one short stop on your life’s adventure, and that it’s more embarrassing to have wasted what’s deep inside of you than it is to stumble.Do what you need to do. Now. Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Nowlast_img read more